All About Loving Your neighbor

Review Redux

4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful touching story, April 3, 2012
This review is from: The Priest and the Peaches (Kindle Edition)

The 5 children from the Peach family lost their mother a while back, and just a few pages into the book lose their father. Without the guidance of their parents, they struggle to survive as a family. Teddy the oldest assumes responsibility Luckily Father Tim Sullivan steps in and acts as a guidance, playing a big role by helping them in difficulties they encounter.
The week after Pops (their father dies) the kids go through a lot, things one wouldn’t want their children to go through. The book is about loving your neighbor (L.Y.N.) acceptance, and learning how to stick together as a family. I enjoyed reading this book, and the message it carried all though. Love and faith can go a long way to healing and providing strength needed to face hardships.


Review Reprint; "I challenge you to read this book, Dare to look inside yourself—"

4.0 out of 5 stars Very Well Written, February 13, 2012
This review is from: The Priest and the Peaches (Kindle Edition)

This book is more than a story to be read… it holds lessons on life, love and happiness that we could all stand to revisit. What I found amazing as I read the story, only covers one week in the life of the Peach children. That one week, seven measly days, just so happened to be kicked off with the untimely death of a father they came to realize they barely knew.

I like to consider myself a good Christian, but books like The Priest and the Peaches that have significant religious themes often make me uncomfortable. To be honest, I briefly thought of declining the request for a review. While the religious aspects of the story did have me squirming in my seat and uncomfortable, I am very glad I read this book. I not only learned about the emotional roller coaster the Peach children road the seven days just after their father passed, I learned a lot about myself.

I learned I need to take a deep breath and try to not let my pride get in the way, I learned that everything and I mean everything happens for a reason. Don’t get me wrong, I sort of knew these things about myself already but something about the Peach children and the other characters that populate their world has moved me in such a way that I can’t exactly explain.

I challenge you to read this book, I challenge you to not learn that something that will at least have you thinking for a second longer in the future. I dare you to look inside yourself and really think about whether you might misjudge a character in your life like Peach children were misjudged (and the people the Peach children misjudged). I challenge you to do more than acknowledge your neighbor, I challenge you to L-Y-N. Want to know exactly what I am talking about? Read the book.


Teens & children (The Priest & The Peaches)

TEENS & KIDS—No Mom, No Pop, No MONEY —OH MY !!!
How to remain together as a family no matter what

The new young adult ebook release by Larry Peterson

Historical fiction novel set in the Bronx in the mid-1960s

Take a seven day journey with the five, newly orphaned Peach kids, as they begin their struggle to remain a family while planning their dad’s funeral.

They find an ally in the local parish priest, Father Tim Sullivan, who tries his best to guide them through the strange, unchartered and turbulent waters of “grown-up world.” A story that is sad, funny, and inspiring as it shows how the power of family love and faith can overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles. 

ThePriestAndThePeaches.com

A "Julia" alternative—meet "Joanie"

President Obama’s campaign web-site has given us the Obama Woman, a gal named “Julia” who we follow in cartoon form from age three through age 67+ . Julia’s life, from the formative years and onward, has been  guided, nurtured  and embraced by and through government programs such as: Head Start, Medicaid, Food Stamps, Obamacare, Pell Grants for education etc. There is never a mention of Julia having parents or siblings or any family at all (they had to be in the mix somewhere but I guess their impact on Julia’s life was minimal). Finally,  as Julia’s wonderful, carefree and orchestrated life winds down, she finds happiness in her senior years as a volunteer in a “community garden”. May I present the JULIA alternative–JOANIE.

Joanie Peach is 17. She did have parents but they died. Her mother, when Joanie was 13, and her dad when she was 17. She has an older brother, Teddy, 18, and three younger brothers aged 14, 10 and 6. They are orphans. Yup–Joanie has had multiple roles in her young life: daughter, sister, replacement mom, high school student, cook, house-keeper, household budget manager, grocery shopper, meal planner, and, of course, nurse in charge of all the cuts, bumps and bruises that little boys seem to attract. I have to be fair–this did take place “way, way”, back in the mid 1960’s. That was a time when the all embraceable and benevolent government was just beginning to get into the “nanny busines”. Consequently, folks (for the most part)counted on their family, friends and church to help them through difficult life challenges.

Joanie Peach and the parentless journey of her and her brothers begins in the YA novel, “The Priest and the Peaches”, the first book in a fictionalized (like Obama’s, Julia) series that will follow the life of these kids.  Joanie and Julia are quite different. Why not spend a few bucks (it is an ebook) to see HOW different and how the faith, strength and love of God and  family can be the foundation that binds and lifts folks together no matter what life may throw their way.


Larry talks about .. growing up in the Bronx

I grew up in the Bronx in the 50’s and 60’s. What can I tell you–IT WAS GREAT! How did it influence my writing of “The Priest and The Peaches”? Simple—the setting for the book is the Bronx and it was my world as a kid, a world that never leaves anyone no matter where you grew up.

So, as I write this, what’s the first thing I remember. The candy stores. They seemed to be everywhere. Right down the block from our building was “Harry’s Candy Store”. Two blocks east on Morris Ave. was “Red’s”. Two blocks west up the hill on Sheridan Ave. was “Raines”. Down the block from Raines was “Loddies”. There was another one on 165th St. Can’t remember the name. These were candy stores all within short walking distances from where we lived. And candy stores sold more than candy. Yes sir, they sold all sorts of stuff we kids could not live without. Besides candy there was bubble gum, baseball cards, comic books, candy buttons, model airplanes, school supplies like erasers and pencils and bottles of Waterman’s Ink so we could fill our fountain pens. They had skate keys (yup, we had to tighten clamps onto the soles of our shoes to keep the skates on) and replacement skate wheels (our skates had metal wheels that wore out on the sidewalks). And, of course, candy stores supplied us with the greatest rubber ball ever made, the Spalding. I don’t know if the game of stick-ball would have ever survived without the Spalding. Most of them also had soda fountains where you could get an egg-cream (a NY original) or a vanilla coke or a cherry coke or an ice cream cone or a hamburger. Finally, we cannot forget the newspapers. Many of the neighborhood men would be outside a candy store around 8 p.m. waiting for the one star edition of the NY Daily News or The Daily Mirror. This was the next day’s news an evening early and it never made any sense to me how they knew what was going to happen tomorrow. Hey, what did I know. I was a kid. If you waited until morning the three or four star edition would be available.

We kids would get home from school around 3 p.m. and within ten minutes we were changed into our “play” clothes and back outside. Stickball, curb-ball, stoop-ball, roller skating, ring-a-leevio, Johnny-on-the-pony, we played something all the time. We also wandered all around the neighborhood and I guess our folks did not worry about where we were unless we did not arrive home at 5:30 for supper. It was amazing how the street always seemed to empty around that time. We all knew better.

You know, I could really “run” with this. It is conjuring up memories from “back in the day”. So I had better stop. To answer the question, How did growing up in the Bronx influence my writing of the book? , well, all I can say is—“Whut, are you kiddin me? Fuhgedabotit.”



FINAL SNEAK PEEK of Chapter Twenty of the young adult ebook "The Priest and the Peaches" – NOW AVAILABLE

A final sneak peek of chapter twenty of The Priest and the Peaches – a young adult ebook release from Tribute Books by Larry Peterson

NOW AVAILABLE!

buy links

Kindle – $2.99
Nook – $4.95
iPad – $4.99
PDF – $4.95
Smashwords – $4.99

CHAPTER TWENTY
Beatrice Amon and the Peaches

Teddy said uneasily, “Well look, Father. I can’t help but think that all Miss Amon did by calling the cops was cause a whole bunch of trouble for all of us—even you.”

The priest’s exasperation with the young man’s remarks was obvious. “Oh really? That’s what you think, is it? Did you listen to one word I just said? Did you?”

Now Teddy was unnerved. When Father Sullivan got angry he seemed to grow two feet in height. He became very intimidating, especially for an 18 year old who knew him since the third grade. “Yes, Father, I was listening.”

“No, Teddy, you weren’t. You were too busy thinking about how much you don’t like Miss Amon. Your pride has gotten in the way of your faith. L-Y-N, remember? Time to move on, Teddy. Miss Amon is not the mean-spirited person you think she is. In fact, none of you really know anything about her, do you? Now, you’re going to have to take this pride of yours and stuff it in your back pocket and sit on it. The fact is, you owe Miss Amon something.”

www.ThePriestAndThePeaches.com

Take a seven day journey with the five, newly orphaned Peach kids, as they begin their struggle to remain a family while planning their dad’s funeral.

They find an ally in the local parish priest, Father Tim Sullivan, who tries his best to guide them through the strange, unchartered and turbulent waters of “grown-up world.” A story that is sad, funny, and inspiring as it shows how the power of family love and faith can overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles.


SNEAK PEEK of Chapter Nineteen of the young adult ebook "The Priest and the Peaches" – NOW AVAILABLE

A sneak peek of chapter nineteen of The Priest and the Peaches – a young adult ebook release from Tribute Books by Larry Peterson

NOW AVAILABLE!

buy links

Kindle – $2.99
Nook – $4.95
iPad – $4.99
PDF – $4.95
Smashwords – $4.99

CHAPTER NINETEEN
Father Sullivan visits Beatrice

He pushed the doorbell and waited. He heard a faint voice coming from inside. “Oh, just a moment, please. I’ll be there as soon as I can. I’m not moving very well. Hold on, please.” It sounded like someone was trapped in a deep hole calling for help as they attempted to climb out.

A few moments passed before Miss Amon slowly opened the door. She was dressed in a floor-length, gray housecoat, a maroon, button-down wool sweater and a pair of rubber boots. Her body was sort of listing to one side and she was holding an ice pack to her bruised forehead.

“Oh my, Beatrice, you look awful. Is there anything I can do for you?”

“Oh no, Father. I’ll be all right. It’s those kids upstairs. My apartment is destroyed. I was almost killed. I don’t know what happened up there or what they were doing. All I know is, I’m lucky to be alive.”

“May I come in, Beatrice?”

“Oh, I’m sorry. Where are my manners? Of course, Father, come in.”

Father Sullivan followed the slow moving, lucky-to-be-alive woman into her apartment. She immediately headed to the sofa, as she fell more than sat on it. She took a deep breath while simultaneously emitting a soft moan. Leaning her head back, she removed the ice pack, shook it to rearrange the ice inside it before placing it back on her forehead.

Father took in the entire performance. “Well, Beatrice, tell me what happened here today. And what in heaven’s name happened to your head?”

www.ThePriestAndThePeaches.com

Take a seven day journey with the five, newly orphaned Peach kids, as they begin their struggle to remain a family while planning their dad’s funeral.

They find an ally in the local parish priest, Father Tim Sullivan, who tries his best to guide them through the strange, unchartered and turbulent waters of “grown-up world.” A story that is sad, funny, and inspiring as it shows how the power of family love and faith can overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles.



SNEAK PEEK of Chapter Seventeen of the young adult ebook "The Priest and the Peaches" – NOW AVAILABLE

A sneak peek of chapter seventeen of The Priest and the Peaches – a young adult ebook release from Tribute Books by Larry Peterson

NOW AVAILABLE!
Holiday Special
Kindle version only 99 cents until January 2
buy link
Kindle – $0.99

other available buy links
Nook – $4.95
PDF – $4.95
Smashwords – $4.99

Coming soon:
iPad ($4.99)

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
“Batman & Robin” collapse a ceiling

“Hey, Beeker, let’s play Batman and Robin. Watch this.” And just like that, Joey bounced across the bed and rolled onto the floor triggering a new round of heavy coughing.

Downstairs, Beatrice was in her living room lying on the sofa. Wrapped in a bathrobe and covered with a blanket, she was quickly using up the box of tissues on the coffee table as she attempted to restrain her cough and keep her nose dry. She heard the thump caused by Joey’s landing. Turning her head upward, she glared at the ceiling. “They’d better not start,” she mumbled to herself.

Beeker started to laugh and decided to keep wearing his damp Batman pajamas. The shirt was stretched up passed his belly button and the legs on the bottoms barely covered his knees. “Okay, watch me.” He climbed onto the dresser before jumping down on the bed. Rolling onto the floor, he said, “Oh, I forgot something.”

He grabbed a dirty towel, tied it around his neck making a Batman cape. Back on top of the dresser, he flew with outstretched arms onto the bed again. The Batman and Robin show was in full swing. They both began taking turns leaping from the dresser to the bed before rolling onto the floor.

Maybe it was an adrenalin rush but the characters they were pretending to be took over their psyche. Beeker and Joey, coughing and sneezing, overcame their blazing fevers turning into superheroes. Time after time, they climbed up on the dresser and flew to the bed.

Beatrice was holding her pounding head in her hands. They have one more minute to stop or else.

The bed, supported by four wooden slats across the bed frame, held together as long as it could. Then Batman made an extra mighty leap and the bed collapsed, slamming to the floor. Not only did the box spring and mattress crash to the floor, the side rails ripped from the headboard causing it to fall forward. The combination of all the parts collapsing together made for a super loud crash.

Beatrice was so startled by the crash that she vaulted up from her prone position. She accidentally rolled off the sofa smashing her head on the edge of the coffee table.

The crash was so loud—it even woke Dancer. Robin, not concerned in the least about the collapsed bed, was about to make another leap when Dancer came bursting in. Seeing the mess he hollered, “What, are the two of you crazy? Look what you did. Oh man, Teddy is gonna freak. We gotta get this fixed. Dang, I gotta go to the bathroom. I’ll be right back.”

Dancer hurried to the bathroom. As he reached the living room, he felt cold water squishing between his toes and under his feet. “What the heck is going on?” He sloshed into the bathroom. The big afghan was floating in water that was spilling over the sides of the tub. “Holy crap…oh, man.”

He ran back to the bedroom yelling, “What did you do? The tub is overflowing and there’s water all over the place.”

“Uh oh, Joey, we forgot to turn the water off.”

www.ThePriestAndThePeaches.com

Take a seven day journey with the five, newly orphaned Peach kids, as they begin their struggle to remain a family while planning their dad’s funeral.

They find an ally in the local parish priest, Father Tim Sullivan, who tries his best to guide them through the strange, unchartered and turbulent waters of “grown-up world.” A story that is sad, funny, and inspiring as it shows how the power of family love and faith can overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles.