This Teenage Christian was Martyred for praying for another Christian being Martyred. Meet St. Victor and St. Corona*

St. Corona                                                                             Aleteia.org

By Larry Peterson

*Right in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic is the city of Anzu, Italy. There is a basilica in Anzu where the relics of St. Victor and St. Corona have been preserved since the ninth century. The name Corona is Latin for crown. The name, coronavirus, is given to the disease because it shows “crown-like” projections on their surfaces. There are other coronaviruses such as MERS and SARS. Ironically, St. Corona is considered as one of the patron saints of pandemics

For people who have faith in God, prayer is the most potent weapon they use to fight adversity. Since the onset of the coronavirus (real name COVID-19), many Catholics have been turning to a little known saint from the 2nd century by the name of Saint Corona. They are praying to her for her intercession with God to help us overcome this insidious and deadly worldwide pandemic.

Little is known about St. Corona, but she and the man she prayed for, St. Victor, are listed in the Roman martyrology and the Hagiography of the Church. There is ambiguity surrounding the dates and locations of  St. Victor’s and St. Corona’s martyrdom. Most sources say it was in Syria, which was under Roman rule. Some say Damascus others, Antioch.  Most agree they were put to death in the year 170 A.D. Most historians agree they died during the reign of Marcus Aurelius and that they were put to death by order of a Roman judge named Sebastian.

The story (legend) tells the tale of a Roman soldier named Victor. The Romans discovered that Victor was a Christian. The soldiers brought Victor before a judge, named Sebastian, who despised Christians. He decided to make an example out of Victor. He was bound to a pillar and summarily whipped until his skin was hanging from his body, and then Sebastian had his eyes gouged out. (I cannot imagine). Through it all, Victor never denied Christ.

Nearby wasa 16-year-old girl name Corona. She was the wife of one of the soldiers, and she was also a Christian. (Corona’s husband did not know his wife was a Christian).  As Victor was being brutalized, Corona decided she needed to help the slowly dying man. She chose to announce her Christianity to all present and hurried over to where they were torturing Victor. She knelt and began to pray for him, letting him know she was there for him. It did not take very long for the soldiers to bring her before Sebastian.

Sebastian was livid that this young woman had so disrespected his authority. He immediately had her put in the prison and tortured. Then, he ordered her tied to the tops of two palm trees, which had been pulled down to the ground. At his signal, the ropes holding the trees down were cut. The trees sprang back away from each other to an upright position. The force was so great that Corona’s body was ripped apart. Then Sebastian ordered Victor beheaded.

The remains in the basilica have been there since the ninth century. In 1943 and again in 1981, they were examined, and the bones are from both a male and female. In the 1981 examination, they discovered cedar pollen, which was a typical plant from the Mediterranean basin during the time in question. Archaeologists confirm that this adheres to ancient Syria and Cyprus.

Saint Victor and Saint Corona are pre-congregation saints meaning that they were chosen as saints prior to Church canonization being standardized. The first saint canonized by a pope was Ulrich, the bishop of Augsburg, who died in 973. He was canonized by Pope John XV at the Lateran Council of 993. Canonization became the general law of the church under Pope Gregory IX (1227-41).

Saint Corona’s feast day, along with Saint Victor’s, is May 14th. We ask both of them to pray for us all that this pandemic subsides.

copyright©Larry Peterson 2020

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.